Monthly Archives: May 2009

A beautiful and quirky journey

The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet by Reif Larsen This book is a thing of beauty. It stands out being an oversized hardback and invites you to pick it up and look inside … whereupon you’ll see all the intricate illustrations, sidebars and marginalia. Then reading the blurb, you’ll find out that it is the story of a 12 year… Read more »

Moviewatch – Coraline (3D)

I read Neil Gaiman’s wonderful children’s novel Coraline last month and blogged about it here, knowing the movie was out this month. Given a choice, I prefer to read the book and then see the movie. So yesterday my daughter and I went to see the film… It was also our first movie in 3D. At Easter we went to… Read more »

Moviewatch – Coraline (3D)

I read Neil Gaiman’s wonderful children’s novel Coraline last month and blogged about it here, knowing the movie was out this month. Given a choice, I prefer to read the book and then see the movie. So yesterday my daughter and I went to see the film… It was also our first movie in 3D. At Easter we went to… Read more »

Incoming

Annabel   28th May 2009   1 Comment on Incoming

There are so many good books arriving at the moment, here’s a few I’m particularly looking forward to reading… The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters – the eagerly awaited ghost story that we’re all looking forward to reading. It’s a classic country house tale set shortly after the end of WWII. Hearts and Minds by Amanda Craig – the sixth… Read more »

One of the best book quotes …

Hunting out a book to lend to a friend, I stumbled over Melvyn Bragg’s excellent biography of Richard Burton Rich: The Life of Richard Burton. This in turn reminded me of a wonderful quote of Burton’s I read in the newspaper absolutely ages ago.  Apparently the Burtons didn’t travel light – Richard always took a trunk of books and when… Read more »

This novel snaps, crackles and pops with electricity

The Invention of Everything Else by Samantha Hunt This Orange prize short-listed novel has had some mixed reviews. To be honest, it’s a bit of a mixture itself, refusing to be easily genrified being: part fictionalised biography of mad physicist Nikola Tesla, part love story, part time-travel SF/fantasy, and part mainstream novel set in New York during WWII. Although it’s… Read more »

Slipping down the list – oops! – Sorry

A couple of months ago I won this book in a draw from Librarything‘s Early Reviewers programme – winners are asked to read and review the books won. Vilnius Poker by Ricardas Gavelis is a novel new in translation by Open Letter Books – I’m told by a Lithuanian Librarything user that it is considered a modern classic in his… Read more »

What did mother do in the war?

The Spy Game by Georgina Harding The direct gaze of the woman sipping a cup of tea on the dustjacket of the UK hardback really caught my eye – a spendid cover and evocative title too. Reading the blurb, I fully expected an espionage story straight out of John Le Carre, but this thoughtful and slow-burning novel is something completely… Read more »

Dear, oh dear, oh dear …

Did you see the Apprentice last night? The teams had to pick products to sell at ‘The Baby Show’. Mercifully both teams had the good sense not to choose the baby stilettoes on offer. What were the designers of this product thinking of when they came up with these? They’re crib shoes for teeny, tiny babies of up 0-6 months… Read more »

An evening with Marina Fiorato

Last night, we were treated to an Italian evening at Mostly Books in Abingdon to celebrate the publication of Marina Fiorato’s second novel which I blogged about here, her first novel having been a hit with us. We had antipasti, biscotti, amaretti, and plenty of Amaretto to wash it all down. I’ve only had Amaretto in puddings before – drinking… Read more »